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Local Public Workers May be Able to Unionize Thanks to a Proposed Bill

Local Public Workers May be Able to Unionize Thanks to a Proposed Bill
Local Public Workers with a bill that would grant them the right to unionize is going to shape up to be the next big labor fight at the state Capitol in Colorado.
  • Post category:News

Local Public Workers with a bill that would grant them the right to unionize is going to shape up to be the next big labor fight at the state Capitol in Colorado.

Sponsored by House Majority Leader Daneya Esgar, local city democrat, the proposal does allow people who work for cities, counties, schools, public hospitals, and other local government entities the right to collectively bargain.

Local Public Workers: Major Expansion of Labor Rights

Thereby it is a major expansion of labor rights for those workers. They can presently form unions but don’t have to negotiate power over their work conditions. That is unless they are recognizing by voters or the organization they work for.

“In fact, we do want to make sure it does not matter where you live. In fact, you have the right to bargain,” Esgar said.

Collective Bargaining

Labor groups are saying it is the last major piece in their long effort to expand the collective bargaining for workers in Colorado. This is going on although the measure is not been introducing. The Democratic lawmakers have passed a measure in 2020. It would allow the union for approximately 28,000 state workers to collectively bargain. Actually, labor advocates had another win last year. This is when they passed a contentious law. It did grant agricultural workers minimum wage. Also collective bargaining plus other protections.

All Coloradans do have the freedom to join a union. In fact, this is all unfinished business,” said Dennis Dougherty, executive director of the Colorado AFL-CIO.

Early opposition due to this year’s effort came from conservatives and public sector groups. Those did include the Colorado Municipal League. It is a powerful advocacy organization that represents cities and towns that does argue the measure would unconstitutionally infringe on local control.

“There is a conversation locally and determining what is appropriate. Also, this is what local governments and their voters are really equipping to be able to do,” said Kevin Bommer, the group’s executive director.

Six figures are spent on a direct mail and digital ad campaign against the measure. This is through the conservative dark money nonprofit Advance Colorado Action. This has been done against the measure, Governor Jared Polis, and Democratic lawmakers. Also, Advance Colorado Institute, an affiliated nonprofit, did say it will sue to overturn the proposal if it became law.

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